Mirroring Christ in our Hospitality

posted in: life together, Women, Worship | 0


There are probably people we know, men and women, who are amazing at showing hospitality.  There was a lady in our church growing up who was fabulous at this.  She welcomed everyone in the church and was a fabulous cook as well.   My mentor is incredible in this skill as well: cooking, opening her door, opening a bed or place to sleep for guests, praying over her guests, etc.  I learned much of my “activity” of hospitality from them.  Thankful.

Our church’s women’s ministry just had a night of learning about hospitality.  I was not able to go but you can find some of the handouts from the sessions on our women’s blog.  I’ve written much about hospitality, but what does it mean in a more spiritual sense?  Meaning, the hospitality that God shows for us?

An illustration you might understand before I get to Tripp’s quote: Some people you welcome into your home with welcome arms.  You can’t wait to go out of your way for them, sit and talk for hours, invite them into your heart and home.  Others, you tolerate.  You really could have them leave at any time, don’t care if they stay or go.  Really, if you are honest, you wish you could probably just show them the door quickly after dinner was open.  (If you are reading this with dropped jaw in disbelief that anyone could ever have such a thought toward another person – look at your own life.  This is where sanctification comes in.  I’m not perfect.  Spirit is still working).

Well, as Tripp says in his book, Dangerous Calling, Christ doesn’t just tolerate us:

“One of the sweetest blessings of the cross of Jesus Christ is that the curtain of separation has been torn in two. No longer are the holy places open only to the high priest once a year. No, now each of God’s children has been welcomed to come with confidence into God’s presence, and not just once a year.”

“We, with all of our sin, weakness, and failures are welcome to do what should blow our minds. We are not only tolerated by God at a distance; no, we are welcomed into intimate personal communion with the King of kings, the Lord of lords, the creator, the sovereign, the Savior. We, as unholy as we are, are told to go with confidence into his holy presence.”

– Paul David Tripp, Dangerous Calling, p. 197.

Live welcomed.